January, 2014


28
Jan 14

Beatles work

The Beatles Recording

Like most kids who saw The Beatles perform on the Ed Sullivan Show in February 1964, I was taken with them. They presented something exotic and new: the hair, the exuberant music, attractive smiles and refreshing personas. Their youthful talent and style was both unique and refreshingly genuine, and the right salve for a nation frightened by the real prospect of thermonuclear war and reeling from Camelot’s unbraiding in Dallas. Fortunately for the world, not just Americans, these young musicians were the real deal. Fads come and go, but The Fabs have stayed and the world is clearly better for it.

I was 8 years old when this polished skiffle-group played Sullivan and I followed them as closely as newspapers, magazines, and TV would supply at the time. There was a lag in communication then, the result of slower technology and gatekeepers, which has since changed. Then our imaginations were forced to work hard in wonder at what the group was up to between songs and LP releases. As I look back on that I realize I was surprisingly mature, at least in this one regard: I may have enjoyed their films with Richard Lester, but even at that pre-teen stage I knew that presentation of ‘Beatles life’ was fanciful and their real substance–dare I say their ‘magic’–lay in the art they created in the studio. 

My art studies were just beginning as Let It Be played in movie theaters; The Beatles, as a group, were no more by the time I reached junior high. At that point I was some years away from the refinement of my visual storytelling skills required to consider teasing out The Beatles’ spirit in visual terms.

This Beatles ambition of mine finally got underway several years ago when, at a show of mine that featured several paintings of local musicians, a client and I shared our love for Beatles music and he challenged me to realize this painting ambition. The time seemed right and several studies were created as warm-ups for larger, more complex compositions to come. My aim was to cover different years in that groups’ development in at least a few studio scenes. Unfortunately, those big, finished artworks got delayed; as Lennon’s wisdom suggests it can happen ‘while you’re busy making other plans.” Now I’m back on it. Stay tuned.

George Harrison Tuning

Examine more of Brad’s work at Brad Faegre Fine Art


28
Jan 14

Thundering, big “Big Boy”

Thundering Up A Frozen Mountain Pass and Steaming From The Rim

In the Fine Arts Building at the Los Angeles County Fair my artwork was exhibited in 1990. For three weeks I also demonstrated watercolor and pastel painting for the public. In one demonstration I created Steaming From The Rim, a pastel painting of engine 18 of the Grand Canyon Railway, which was preparing to take passengers to the South Rim from Williams, Arizona, and back. It was during this fair exhibition that I first examined Union Pacific 4014 “Big Boy,” then on display at the RailGiants exhibit on the Fairplex grounds. It was in the summer of the following year, while driving through the San Juan Mountains of Colorado, that I imagined one of these 4-8-8-4 steam behemoths pulling freight over that mountainous terrain in the snow. Thundering Over a Frozen Mountain Pass was visualized and soon painted in my studio. That articulated engine, UP 4014, is now being moved and will be restored to service by Union Pacific in the next few years. I’m looking forward to experiencing that monster thundering past, but maybe not up to my chest in snow.

Thundering Up A Frozen Mountain Pass and Steaming From The Rim

To purchase the print of Thundering Up A Frozen Mountain Pass and Steaming From The Rim, click this link

Thundering Up A Frozen Mountain Pass and Steaming From The Rim

Detail of Thundering Up A Frozen Mountain Pass

Examine more of Brad’s work at Brad Faegre Fine Art